Posts tagged The Freedom Fighters

MTV Geek covered DC Entertainment’s evening with Grant Morrison, where they showcasing original artwork by Yanick Paquette from the upcoming graphic novel, Wonder Woman: Earth One an the Shazam issue of  Multiversity entitled “Thunderworld” with art by Cameron Stewart (above in black & white (the color is from 52 #52)). Morrison described the issue of “Thunderworld” as:

It’s told, I guess, almost in a Pixar kind of way, as if this forty-page story was the first movie in a big franchise.

Multiversity will be a 40-page nine issue run, with the first and last issue, acting as bookends. Morrison will be using the meta-structure set up in The Flash #123 “Flash of Two Worlds” where Barry Allen could read about Jay Garrick’s adventures in comic books to set up what he calls “the most terrifying threat anyone’s ever created in a comic. I don’t do hyperbole.”

One issue will have a story featuring Doctor Fate and Lady Blackhawk characters. Judging from the description below it sounds like it will be taking place on Earth 20, seen in Final Crisis: Superman Beyond #1.

The second story will be a pulp adventure tale, using both old pulp characters and repurposed characters who could easily fit the mold, including an Indiana Jones by way of John Constantine “Doc” Fate. Also present will be Lady Blackhawk, the Atom and the Immortal Man in a story set in the year 2013 after a world war has decimated the human populace down to two billion people. 

The details described below on the Freedom Fighters issue sound pretty crazy. I wonder how different this world will be from the on that appears above in one panel of 52 #52.

After that, readers will be due for a trip to Earth-10 (formerly Earth X in the pre-Crisis world) home of the Nazi superheroes that helped defeat the Allies in World War II. The issue, which Morrison gleefully revealed “opens with Hitler on the toilet reading Action Comics” and yelling about Superman. Morrison reveals that in this world, Superman’s rocket landed in 1938 in Nazi-occupied territory and Hitler raises the child. Everything in the story (which Morrison compares in scope to Shakespeare and HBO epics) will evolve from that point, with Superman realizing, in his twenty-fifth year of life, the precise nature of Hitler’s evil and realizing “who the baddie is”. Deciding instead to take down the Nazi regime and create a utopia, Superman won’t stray too far from how he’s been raised, with Morrison promising sweeping Wagnerian architecture and a melodramatic world. He promises the story will delve deep into Superman’s inner conflict; he’s created a Utopian society that looks perfect but “is built on the bones of the dead” and has to come crumbling down. At this point in the story, in 1956, Morrison will re-introduce the Quality characters known collectively as The Freedom Fighters, this time making them both literal and figurative enemies of Hitler. Uncle Sam, the last remaining vestige of America, will again form and lead the team. Quoting Emma Lazarus (“Give me…your huddled masses yearning to breathe free”), Morrison teases a team featuring a version of Dollman who’s a Jehovah’s Witness, a homosexual Ray, a gypsy Phantom Lady and an African version of Black Condor in what Morrison calls “the return of the oppressed.” Thematically, the story will deal with a society under siege by terrorists who are in the right, and the regime they’re striking against knows it.

The coverage of the evenings events are pretty detailed and they go into a lot more. It’s a good read. I just picked out the JSA related material. I’d suggest reading the full article.

Jerry Ordway has been posting his creative process for the covers of the Human Bomb mini-series he is illustrating on his blog. He has posts for issues #1, #2, and #3. I really like some of his looser sketches like the one above. I’m interested to see what he posts for the final issue (out today).

Jerry Ordway has been posting his creative process for the covers of the Human Bomb mini-series he is illustrating on his blog. He has posts for issues #1, #2, and #3. I really like some of his looser sketches like the one above. I’m interested to see what he posts for the final issue (out today).

The Source has a preview of the final issue of the Human Bomb mini-series byJustin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti and illustrated by Jerry Ordway.

The Source has a preview of the final issue of the Human Bomb mini-series byJustin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti and illustrated by Jerry Ordway.

The New 52, Neon the Unknown showed up in Human Bomb #3 last week. That gives the New 52, The Ray, Uncle Sam, Phantom Lady, Doll Man, Human Bomb, Miss America, and Neon the Unknown. Where are Black Condor and Firebrand?

What are your thoughts on the new Neon and Human Bomb? Which Quality character do you want to see revamped next?

Comixology has the whole 2009 Red Tornado six-issue mini-series written by Kevin Van Hook, with art by Jose Louis and J.P. Mayer available for 99¢ each. The story introduces a new extended family for Red Tornado, including a Freedom Fighters legacy character, the Red Torpedo.

Comixology has the whole 2009 Red Tornado six-issue mini-series written by Kevin Van Hook, with art by Jose Louis and J.P. Mayer available for 99¢ each. The story introduces a new extended family for Red Tornado, including a Freedom Fighters legacy character, the Red Torpedo.

Palmiotti & Gray Talk Phantom Lady

Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray spoke with CBR about their upcoming Phantom Lady miniseries. Here is an excerpt from the interview.

Along those lines, what’s the story in your miniseries? Are we seeing the origin of these two heroes?

Gray: Yes, the origin as well as revamping them in a way that is closer to their original incarnations. Phantom Lady is more of a street level heroine in this book. That’s a departure from the nearly cosmic scale of Stormy Knight and the sort of spoiled princess with emotional problems during our “Uncle Sam And The Freedom Fighters” runs.

Go read the rest.